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Homework

Our goal at Braunton Academy is to develop you to become independent life-long learners. Having a good positive attitude to school work, homework and independent learning will reap rewards right through your life.

 

Recording Homework

Homework needs to be recorded in the Student Planner but can also be accessed online via Class Charts.

Homework Club

Homework Club is run every day from 3.05pm-4.15pm in the Library.

Key Stage 3 Homework Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the nature of the timetable, the night that homework tasks will be set varies according to the teaching group and so a fixed date timetable is not issued.

Teachers should not set homework tasks to be completed for the next day but should give a clear deadline for each task so that students can plan their study appropriately.

Tasks should be scaffolded as appropriate to support students with Additional Learning Needs.

In Years 7 and 8 it is expected that students will spend between 30-40 minutes per subject each night. In Year 9, this should be extended to 45-50 minutes per subject each night.

Key Stage 4 Homework Schedule

In Key stage 4, students can expect to be given a homework task to complete in each subject area on a weekly basis. The type of task will vary depending on the subject and the needs of the course.

Students should be made aware that even when a formal task has not been set, it is their responsibility to engage with their subjects so that they:

  • Understand the content of the subject matter they are learning.

  • Commit key knowledge and terminology to memory.

  • Apply their learning to exercises, questions, quizzes, new situations.

  • Identify gaps in their knowledge, skills and understanding and develop action plans accordingly.

  • Undertake planning and preparation for NEAs as required Key Stage 4 students should spend, on average, 2-3 hours each day on independent study in total. (45 minutes per day are completed in Period 6).

Education Endowment Foundation Research Findings

High Impact +4 Months

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

1.Where do I find good homework resources on line?

Try BBC bitesize for revision for both Key Stage 3 and 4. For more information click on the following link to take you to your virtual learning environment (VLE).  Also there is no such thing as 'no homework '.  You should always take responsibility for your learning by accessing the on-line resources yourself and reviewing each day what you learned in school

2.What do I do if I am not on-line at home?

Everyday at lunch time there is a Homework club in the Library where you can ask for help if you get stuck or need a resource you can't find. There are computers there too if you are not on-line at home. The Library is open at break, lunchtime and after school.

3. When do I get homework and how much am I expected to do?

Homework is set based on a homework timetable which is on the download section of this page. Staff will set homework according to the timetable each class has and will agree handing in times with you. You may get revision homework which involve learning for tests and exams. Sometimes you may be set a task which you complete in a team and we know that you enjoy that kind of homework.

For more detail please take a look at the planner guidance downloads for KS3 and KS4.

4. What happens if I don't do my homework?

If you offer a good reason, with a note in the planner from your parents, you should be given more time to complete the assignment.

If you repeatedly don't hand in your homework, your teacher will inform your parents and you will get a 4 (serious cause for concern) in your mid-term assessments. You will also stand the risk of getting homework detentions at lunch time or after school. You will also find it very hard to meet your target grades and you will disappoint yourself at GCSE.

If your GCSEs are below your target grades you will find your choices for College and employment will be much more limited. I meet many people who regret not doing their homework and making the most of their time at school.

SUBJECT

GUIDELINE

English

  1. Weekly reading as part of the Accelerated Reader programme (Y7-8).

  2. PiXL English Reading for Meaning (Y9).

  3. Fortnightly spelling, punctuation and grammar tasks (Y7-9).

Mathematics

  1. Weekly task set for all KS3 classes.

Science

  1. Weekly task related to taught units.

Modern Foreign Languages

  1. One weekly task in French.

  2. One weekly task in German.

Humanities

Geography

  1. Two half termly tasks.

  2. One PIXL independence half termly task.

History

  1. Two half termly tasks.

Beliefs & Values

  1. One half termly task.

Expressive Arts

Art, Drama and Music all set one task each half term.

Technology

Weekly task for all students to support in class projects.

Computing

One task set each half term.

What is it?
 

Homework refers to tasks given to pupils by their teachers to be completed outside of usual lessons.

Homework activities vary significantly, particularly between younger and older pupils, including but not limited to home reading activities, longer projects or essays and more directed and focused work such as revision for tests.
 

Our definition also includes activities such as ​‘homework clubs’ where pupils have the opportunity to complete homework in school but outside normal school hours, and ​‘flipped learning’ models, where pupils prepare at home for classroom discussion and application tasks.

Key findings

1. Homework has a positive impact on average (+ 5 months), particularly with pupils in secondary schools.

2. Homework that is linked to classroom work tends to be more effective. In particular, studies that included feedback on homework had higher impacts on learning.

3. It is important to make the purpose of homework clear to pupils (e.g. to increase a specific area of knowledge, or to develop fluency in a particular area).

How effective is the approach?

The average impact of homework is positive across both primary and secondary school.
 

The quality of the task set appears to be more important than the quantity of work required from the pupil. There is some evidence that the impact of homework diminishes as the amount of time pupils spend on it increases. The studies reviewed with the highest impacts set homework twice a week in a particular subject.
 

Evidence also suggests that how homework relates to learning during normal school time is important. In the most effective examples homework was an integral part of learning, rather than an add-on. To maximise impact, it also appears to be important that students are provided with high quality feedback on their work (see Feedback).